Taal: Information and History

Taal Lake is a freshwater lake in the province of Batangas, on the island of Luzon in the Philippines. The lake fills Taal Caldera, a large volcanic caldera formed by very large eruptions between 100,000 and 500,000 years ago.

taalArea: 234.2 km2

Surface elevation: 5.00 m

Length: 25 km

Width: 18 km

Mean depth: 100 m

Taal volcano with its lake-filled 15×20 km wide Talisay (Taal) caldera is a beautiful caldera volcano, but also one of the most active and dangerous volcanoes of the Philippines. Taal has had some of the country’s largest and deadliest eruptions: At least 6 eruptions during the recorded history of Taal since 1572 claimed fatalities, mostly from powerful pyroclastic flows, as well as tsunamis produced in the crater lake.

The island is formed by overlapping stratovolcanoes, cinder cones and tuff rings (maars). Historic eruptions have seen the constant change and growth of the island.

Taal caused one of the worst volcano disasters in history: its eruption in 1911 killed 1,334 people and caused ash fall as far as Manila city. Due to its devastating potential, Taal was declared one of the “Decade Volcanoes” in the Decade Volcanoes program of the 1990s in order to increase study and monitoring of the volcano. Taal is today one of the most closely monitored volcanoes in the region. An increase in seismic activity under Taal was recorded in November 2006, followed by an increase in hot water springs in the crater in April 2007.